Breast Cancer Facts Tips

Read these 14 Breast Cancer Facts Tips tips to make your life smarter, better, faster and wiser. Each tip is approved by our Editors and created by expert writers so great we call them Gurus. LifeTips is the place to go when you need to know about Breast Cancer tips and hundreds of other topics.

Breast Cancer Facts Tips has been rated 3.2 out of 5 based on 556 ratings and 1 user reviews.
How many women die from breast cancer each year?

Breast Cancer Deaths

In the United States, it is estimated that approximately 40,000 women will die from breast cancer. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer, with lung cancer being the most common cause of death due to cancer. Even though, older women are more likely to get breast cancer, younger women are more likely to die from it. This might be due to younger women having more aggressive breast cancers, coupled with the fact they may not go in as regularly for screening as an older woman. However, the best advice is to visit your doctor to be screened early, and as often as he or she recommends. Despite the grim statistics, a history of breast cancer in the United States reveals that the number of deaths due to the disease is declining as science makes strides in early detection and treatment methods. The average five-year survival rate for breast cancer patients is between 81% and 86%, depending on the woman's age. But with early detection, the odds of surviving breast cancer are closer to 96%. In summary, it is strongly recommended that consult your doctor about scheduling a mammogram.

   
Where can I find the latest information on breast cancer?

Finding the Latest Information on Breast Cancer

With the increase in the incidence of breast cancer, new research is being published everyday. Some of the best places to keep updated about breast cancer information include articles on breast cancer and the websites of organizations such as thee the American Cancer Society, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Breast Cancer Foundation. While surfing the Internet, be sure to visit websites of official organizations. Virtually anyone can start a website with breast cancer information, but this information might be outdated or not reliable.

Furthermore, official organizations give information for free, so never fall victim to a scam asking you to pay for the latest information on breast cancer. If you prefer more in depth research that what is contained on the Internet, a trip to your local public or university library can also help you find the information that you need.

   
Should I take part in breast cancer research if I have breast cancer?

Clinical Trials for Women Who Have Breast Cancer

Anyone who has been diagnosed with breast cancer and interested in participating in a clinical trial should first consult their doctor to discuss the positive and negative points to this decision. There are inherent risks, but there is also the possibility of being able to be the first to benefit from a new cancer treatment.

Sometimes cancer patients will view taking part in a clinical research trial as a last resort if all other treatment options have been unsuccessfully exhausted. But patients at all stages of breast cancer can take part in clinical trials, and have access to the best technology and treatment available.

   
How can I help build awareness of breast cancer?

Taking Part in the Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign

Anyone with an interest in breast cancer can design a breast cancer awareness campaign. The goal of a breast cancer awareness campaign is to spread the word about breast cancer risk, inform women about breast cancer facts or statistics, and teach the importance of screening and early detection. In 1993, the effort went national with a presidential proclamation that designated the third Friday of every October as National Mammography Day. Since then, the entire month of October has become National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM). On the NBCAM Web site, www.ncbam.com, it is possible to download a program guide with tips, brochures, logos, and other material to get started on your campaign for breast cancer awareness.

   
Who can get breast cancer?

The Likelihood of Developing Breast Cancer In The Average Woman

Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer that women will be diagnosed with. It is estimated that approximately one million wommen worldwide will develop breast cancer with 200,000 - 250,000 cases being diagnosed in the United States. It is also estimated that 40,000 women in the United States will die from it. Even though the incidence or the number of new cases in the United States might seem high, there has been a drop in the number of deaths resulting from breast cancer.

Therefore, the odds of getting breast cancer increases with age, and many of the women diagnosed with breast cancer are older than 40. A commonly mentioned breast cancer statistic is that the average woman has a "1 in 8" chance of developing breast cancer during their lifetime. However, this statistic only takes into account women who live to be at least 90 years of age. The statistical odds that a woman in her 60's will get breast cancer, is only 1 in 26. As you review the statistics being presented, it is important to not become overwhelmed.

   
What exactly is breast cancer?

How Does Breast Cancer Develop?

What is breast cancer?

Since our first science class, we have been taught that the body is composed of cells. As older cells die, the body will make new cells to replace them. Breasts are no exception to this rule. Normal breast cells grow, divide, and function in a controlled manner according to the genetic commands from the DNA contained in each cell's nucleus. However, cancer develops when these cells fail to grow and reproduce in a controlled manner. Instead cell division and growth happens more rapidly resulting in a tumor or lump being formed. Depending on what stage the cancer is in, these tumor cells hardly their parent cells due to uncontrolled growth.

However, it should be noted that not all lumps located within the bests are cancerous. There are benign or non-cancerous lumps that breasts can develop, however it is important to consult your physician to determine if a lump is cancerous or not. For further reading visit: What is breast cancer?

   
Has research made significant changes to the way breast cancer is diagnosed and treated?

Research and Breast Cancer Treatment

In 1975, a radical mastectomy was usually the standard treatment for breast cancer. The entire breast, the underlying muscle, and lymph nodes under the arm were surgically removed as the best way to get rid of the cancer.

Over the past 30 years, treatment has shifted toward a "breast conservation" philosophy. In a great majority of cases, breast cancer now can be treated without a disfiguring, life-changing mastectomy. Since science has made great strides in the methods doctors use to identify and treat breast cancer, it is beneficial to take advantage of the new screening technologies that allow breast cancer to be detected and treated before a mastectomy is necessary.

   
Can I be part of the research effort if I don't have breast cancer?

Clinical Trials for Women Who Not Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

Most clinical studies involving breast cancer compare the effectiveness of two different treatment methods. For that reason, most study participants have already been diagnosed with breast cancer. However, there are clinical trials for women who are at a high risk for developing breast cancer. If you are a woman who has not been diagnosed with breast cancer, you might be able to take part in these clinical trials. It is important to know that you may encounter a treatment method whose long-term side effects are yet unknown. Therefore, it is necessary to consider how these side effects might affect your health. Should you choose to take part in a breast cancer clinical trial, you will be following in the footsteps of thousands of women whose willingness to be studied has resulted in vast improvements in the treatment of breast cancer.

   
How do I know if breast cancer information is reliable?

Checking the Validity of Breast Cancer Information

With the invention of the Internet there is a vast amount of information available about breast cancer facts that is just a click away. Unfortunately, it is not possible to trust everything read on the Internet. Even with breast cancer, there are myths and false information available. If you are looking for breast cancer information, always consider the source. Chances are, the information on breast cancer is reliable if it comes directly from a reputable organization like the American Cancer Society or the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Beware of information that claims to be endorsed by an organization that does not sound familiar. E-mails sent to you with phrases like "According to the American Cancer Society...", should be investigated at the organization's website to check the validity of the information. However, the most valuable source of information on breast cancer is your doctor. Your doctor will be able to answer any questions you might have and dispel any myths.

   
What are the most popular breast cancer research topics?

Leading Topics in Breast Cancer Research

Some of the most promising breast cancer research has focused on screening and early detection.

The goal is to detect breast cancer at stages earlier than before, especially in the breasts of young women that are too dense for effective mammograms. Meanwhile research in breast cancer surgery has focused on more effective ways to remove tumors, including the possibility of surgical techniques that either destroy the tumor using heat or freezing. Yet other researchers are reviewing the risk factors women can change to prevent being diagnosed with breast cancer. New developments in drug treatments have helped reduce to mortality rate attributed to breast cancer, while looking for ways to treat breast cancer with a reduction in side effects. With new breast cancer research being reported, these results inspire us to think we are one step closer to finding a cure.

   
What is the Breast Cancer Research Program?

Taking Part in the Breast Cancer Research Program

The Breast Cancer Research Program is a joint venture between the military, scientists, medical professionals and breast cancer survivors. The program is unique among breast cancer research entities in that it actively seeks the input of those who may know breast cancer best--the people who've lived through it. If you are a survivor, patient, or family member of someone with breast cancer, you may be eligible to participate as a representative in the program and help provide breast cancer information. For more information, visit http://cdmrp.army.mil/cwg/apply.htm.

   
What is the difference between absolute and relative breast cancer risk factors when determining personal statistics?

Interpreting Breast Cancer Statistics: The Difference Between Absolute and Relative Breast Cancer Risk Factors

A risk factor can be defined as something that may increase your chance of getting breast cancer. There are two ways that scientists define risk factors: absolute and relative. An absolute breast cancer risk factor is the chance a particular group of people will develop breast cancer over a specific time period of time. For example, if you are a woman, you have a 1 in 8 (or 12.5%) chance of developing breast cancer in your lifetime. A relative breast cancer risk factor compares how something specific, (like inheriting a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation), will change your risk compared to those who don't have that specific thing. So, if a woman who has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation has up to an 80% chance in relative risk of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis during her lifetime (and at a younger age) over those who don't, what does that breast cancer statistic mean? Multiply the absolute risk of 12.5% by the relative risk of 80%. The answer is 10%. So 10% is the size of the increase in risk. Then add the 10% increase in risk to the 12.5% risk, and she has a 22.5% absolute risk of breast cancer during her lifetime, at a younger age, if she has inherited a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. It is important to know the difference between absolute and relative risk so you can determine how certain breast cancer statistics apply to you.

   
What is the difference between absolute and relative breast cancer risk factors when determining personal statistics?

Interpreting Breast Cancer Statistics: The Difference Between Absolute and Relative Breast Cancer Risk Factors

A risk factor can be defined as something that may increase your chance of getting breast cancer. There are two ways that scientists define risk factors: absolute and relative. An absolute breast cancer risk factor is the chance a particular group of people will develop breast cancer over a specific time period of time. For example, if you are a woman, you have a 1 in 8 (or 12.5%) chance of developing breast cancer in your lifetime. A relative breast cancer risk factor compares how something specific, (like inheriting a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation), will change your risk compared to those who don't have that specific thing. So, if a woman who has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation has up to an 80% chance in relative risk of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis during her lifetime (and at a younger age) over those who don't, what does that breast cancer statistic mean? Multiply the absolute risk of 12.5% by the relative risk of 80%. The answer is 10%. So 10% is the size of the increase in risk. Then add the 10% increase in risk to the 12.5% risk, and she has a 22.5% absolute risk of breast cancer during her lifetime, at a younger age, if she has inherited a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. It is important to know the difference between absolute and relative risk so you can determine how certain breast cancer statistics apply to you.

   
What is the difference between absolute and relative breast cancer risk factors when determining personal statistics?

Interpreting Breast Cancer Statistics: The Difference Between Absolute and Relative Breast Cancer Risk Factors

A risk factor can be defined as something that may increase your chance of getting breast cancer. There are two ways that scientists define risk factors: absolute and relative. An absolute breast cancer risk factor is the chance a particular group of people will develop breast cancer over a specific time period of time. For example, if you are a woman, you have a 1 in 8 (or 12.5%) chance of developing breast cancer in your lifetime. A relative breast cancer risk factor compares how something specific, (like inheriting a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation), will change your risk compared to those who don’t have that specific thing. So, if a woman who has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation has up to an 80% chance in relative risk of receiving a breast cancer diagnosis during her lifetime (and at a younger age) over those who don’t, what does that breast cancer statistic mean? Multiply the absolute risk of 12.5% by the relative risk of 80%. The answer is 10%. So 10% is the size of the increase in risk. Then add the 10% increase in risk to the 12.5% risk, and she has a 22.5% absolute risk of breast cancer during her lifetime, at a younger age, if she has inherited a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. It is important to know the difference between absolute and relative risk so you can determine how certain breast cancer statistics apply to you.

   
Not finding the advice and tips you need on this Breast Cancer Tip Site? Request a Tip Now!


Guru Spotlight
Lynda Moultry